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VOGEL Centralized Lubrication Systems

1 0002 US

Systems, Symbols, Functions, Planning, Installation

A VOGEL centralized lubrication system performs the task of supplying individual lube points or groups of points with varying amounts of exactly metered lubricant from one central location to meet their different needs. Oil and grease of NLGI grades 000 to 2 are used as the lubricant.

Care taken during the installation, start up and maintenance of the central lubrication system will help to enhance the operating readiness and life of your machines. The central lubrication system must be given the same attention as all the other sophi sticated equipment on a machine. The many years of experience we have had in the field of central lubrication technology for machines and systems will help you solve the problems you encounter when planning and using such installations. The members of our field service will be pleased to advise you.

Centralized lubrication systems, an overview

(based on DIN ISO 1219 and/or DIN 24 271)

Types Centralized lubrication systems

Circulating lubrication systems

Systems

Lubricant

Total loss systems

Lubricants

oil

Single line systems

oil Fett

(NLGI grades 000 to 1)

oil

Progressive feeder systems

oil Fett

(NLGI grades 000 to 2)

oil

Dual line systems

oil grease

(NLGI grades 000 to 2)

oil

Multi line systems

oil grease

(NLGI grades 000 to 2)

oil

Restrictor systems

oil

Oil + air systems

oil

VOGEL Centralized Lubrication Systems

1 0000 US

2

Single line total loss lubrication system

For relatively small, consumption oriented amounts of oil per lube point and intermittent oil delivery.

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Piston pumps

Piston pumps have a limited delivery volume per stroke, as a result of which there are limits on the metered quantities and size of a system. Piston pumps are used in the form of manually, mechanically, hydraulically or pneumatically actuated pumps.

See example of a system, diagram 2.

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The oil delivery units are manually, mechanically, hydraulically or pneumatically actuated piston pumps or intermittently oper ated gear pumps. The lubricant is metered out by piston distributors installed in the tubing system. Exchangeable metering nipples on the dis tributors make it possible to supply every lube point with the requisite amount of lubricant per stroke or pump work cycle. The metered quantities range from 0.01 to 1.5 ccm per lubri cation pulse and lube point. The amount of lubricant to be fed to the lube points can also be influenced with the number of lubrication pulses. An oil return line from the lube point to the oil reservoir is not required on total loss lubrication systems.

The basic layout of a single line total loss lubrication system is always the same: pump, piston distributor main line (connection: pump ­ distributor), secondary line (connection: distributor ­ lube point). Automatically operated systems also come with control and monitoring units, pressure switches, float switches, indica tor lights.

Both groups of pumps, piston and gear pumps, have a hydraulic pressure relief device that lowers the pressure of the lubricant in the main line (10 45 bars) to a residual pressure ( 0.4 bars) via a relief valve after the lubricant has been delivered. This process causes the distributors to reverse.

Piston distributors

Piston distributors meter out and distribute the oil delivered by the pump (e.g. oil or grease of NLGI grades 000 or 00). The quanti ties of lubricant for the individual lube points are determined by exchangeable metering nipples. The metered quantity is shown on the individual nipples. Four groups of distributors that differ in terms of metering ranges and sizes can be chosen from to comply with the amounts required and space available. A mixture of the different distribu tor groups can be used in one system.

See leaflets 1 1101 US, 1 1108 US, 1 1110 US, 1 1202 US, 1 1203 US, 1 5001 US

Gear pumps

Because of their electric drive, gear pumps are especially well suited for automatic systems with monitoring and safety equipment; they can also be put to advantageous use on remote control systems operated by pushbutton.

See example of system, diagram 1. Model MFE

Examples of systems

Diagram 1: Gear pump unit, model MFE

Filter

Pressure gauge

Piston distributor

Filler coupling Float switch Vent filter Suction strainer Pressure switch, max.

Pressure switch, min.

Diagram 2: Piston pump, pneum. actuated

VOGEL Centralized Lubrication Systems

1 0002 US

3

Planning, installation and maintenance

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Determine the number of lube points. Assume the amounts of oil required per lube point and the total amount of oil required per stroke (with piston pumps) or work cycle (with gear pumps). Select the distributors in accordance with the metering range and space available. A distinction must be made between oil only distributors and those also suitable for fluid grease. Choose pumps in accordance with the type of actuation and system capacity. *) Determine the type of control for automatic systems (time or load dependent) and any monitoring system that might be required.

lube point

secondary line

socket union double cone sleeve

Systems lubrication Central Read VOGEL

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